3 Reasons Homeowners Should Leave Tree Work to the Professionals

Are you a do-it-yourself type of homeowner? You don’t like the idea of outsourcing tree work. It may seem like an unnecessary expense. However, did you know that the costs of tackling tree care on your own can run high? Well, you could face property damage, hospital bills and a ruined landscape, none of which are cheap. The truth is that most homeowners don’t have the necessary tools or know-how to safely handle tree work on their own. Each year, many people get severely injured and even killed attempting to do this work without experienced help.

We think there are three major reasons why you should leave tree work to the professionals. They are, in no order of importance.

  1. Lack of knowledge and training. Safe tree work requires an extensive knowledge of tree physics and biology. This can take years of study and experience to acquire. For example, felling a tree in a controlled manner is not as simple as cutting through the trunk with a chain saw. It requires establishing a drop zone, making precise cuts and sometimes guiding the tree safely to the ground, using ropes as leverage. When a homeowner attempts to do this, they can get severely injured or killed if a tree falls in an unexpected direction. Up-ended root balls are also unpredictable. Severing the trunk of a fallen tree from an up-ended root releases tension to the tree. This tension may be strong enough to pull the stump and the root ball back into the hole, trapping anyone or anything nearby beneath it. Other hazards may be invisible to the untrained eye like rotten trunks and limbs, pest and fungal infestations and other diseases and defects that can only be treated by an experienced tree care provider.
  2. Poor situational awareness. Even homeowners who know their way around trees may still fall victim to nearby hazards. Electrical wires are a common situational hazard when doing tree work. Many trees grow near power lines and have their branches, leaves and limbs entangled in live wires. Each year, lots of people are injured or killed when they come into contact with an energized line, either directly or indirectly. Navigating this hazard is tricky, even for professionals, and should not be attempted by homeowners under any circumstance. Attempting do-it-yourself tree work is bad enough in and of itself, but some homeowners go a step further and try to finish the job alone. This further impairs situational awareness. If you try and do all the work yourself, you are putting yourself in unnecessary danger. If you insist upon doing tree work without a professional tree service like Austin Tree Service, we must insist that you have at least one other person working with you. Even our professional tree care providers work in teams.
  3. Improper use of tools. Homeowners often use incorrect, faulty or complicated tools when attempting do-it-yourself tree care. These may hurt themselves and others while attempting tree work. For example, chain saws are incredibly dangerous and easy to misuse. A common mistake is to use a dull chain saw. This forces the operator to use excess pressure, causing them to lose control of the situation and the tool. Many homeowners also use the chainsaw to cut branches on the ground. This can result in kickback and painful injuries when the bar tip hits the dirt or other foliage. Misused ladders are another source of injury. Using a ladder that is too short, set on unstable ground or supported by a faulty limb can easily result in a fall from the tree. Ladders can be sometimes knocked out by the same limb that you just cut. In general, tree work requires tools that the average homeowner doesn’t have like stump grinders, wood chips and aerial lifts.

Knowing how dangerous tree work can be, don’t you want to reconsider doing it yourself? We, at Austin Tree Service have the experience and tools to take care of your trees, no matter what the problem. Give us a call today at 512-341-8888 for more information.

 

 

Nutrition for Trees

You have trees. You want them to have proper nutrition, but how do you make sure that happens? Well, first, you need a little bit of an understanding of a tree’s natural habitat and how it obtains its mineral nutrients. Trees are built to thrive in nature. They draw life from nutrient dense soil, plentiful water and interactions with wildlife. Growing trees in an urban environment may be a little difficult, but it is by no means impossible. People do it all the time.

To help with your gaps in knowledge, you should consider consulting with our certified arborist to develop a nutrient management program for your trees. You should also be willing to apply supplements as needed. We, at Austin Tree, can really help you decide what the best nutrition for your trees should be.

Fertility Management

A regular application of fertilizer might be necessary to ensure that your trees have adequate nutrition. Fertilizers may be natural or synthetic. However, they must aim to provide trees with proper nutrients. The common objectives of fertilization should be:

  • To overcome a visible nutrient deficiency,
  • To eliminate a deficiency that’s not obviously visible but that was detected through soil or foliar analysis,
  • To increase vegetative growth, flowering or fruiting,
  • And to increase the vitality of the plant.

Fertilizer and Soil pH Levels

Most professional arborist practice ‘prescription fertilization’, which means that they only apply nutrients that are found to be deficient. Why? Liberal fertilization can ruin your soil’s pH balance. That is not good for your tree at all. An unbalanced pH will affect the availability of many nutrients. We know that nutrients are vital to a tree’s health, but they should never be added if they compromise your soil’s pH levels. To avoid this problem, measure your soil’s pH level before you apply fertilizer or consult us.

Measuring pH Levels

The pH scale measures how acidic or basic a substance is. It ranges from 0 to 14 with 7 being the neutral value. A pH level less than 7 is acidic, while a pH greater than 7 is basic. Homeowners can take a soil sample and send it to their local university cooperative extension service. Your best bet is to call us to perform a soil test. (You can visit this website to learn how to take a soil sample.) We can make custom recommendations based on the results of the soil sample analysis. Please note that pH levels can change over time, so be sure to conduct follow-up tests and adjust your soil accordingly.

Choosing a Fertilizer

Professional tree care services have access to slow-release fertilizers or can tell you where to get them. These are formulated for your tree’s health. Often, professional slow-release fertilizers reduce the need for repeated treatments over the course of the growing season. When choosing an appropriate fertilizer for trees, you need to have a fertilizer with the following qualities:

  • Features at least 50% slow-release,
  • Has a salt-index of less than 50 (salt is not good for tree health),
  • And does not have high ratios of potassium and phosphorous. Trees don’t like 10-10-10 fertilizers.

Fertilizer Application Methods

Once you’ve gone ahead and selected your fertilizer, it’s time to apply it. Fertilizer should be applied prior to soil prior to planting. As your tree grows, you’ll need to develop alternate methods for fertilizer application.

Surface Application – This works best when there’s no turf or ground cover over the roots. Liquid surface application can be made using a variety of spray equipment. To achieve an even distribution of fertilizer, a flooding tip or water breaker nozzle is preferred for surface application. Dry fertilizer can be used but needs to be watered-in. Do not use surface applications where runoff can occur.

Subsurface Application – This method requires you to drill holes 2-4” wide to a depth of 4-8” and pouring a specific amount of fertilizer into each hole. There should be at least 2 inches between the top of the fertilizer and the surface of the soil. The fertilizer should be equally distributed among all holes. Drill holes in a grid pattern, with holes spaced 12 to 36 inches apart. This method is labor-intensive and can damage roots so it shouldn’t be your go-to fertilizer application. Professional tree companies like us can provide a subsurface liquid injection with slow-release fertilizer as an alternative.

Foliar & Trunk Application – You can apply a fertilizer to foliage, or it can be injected directly into the tree. Foliar spray or trunk injections should not be your first course of action. They should be reserved for rare cases when soil application is not effective or practical to apply. This is an advanced application and is best done by a professional.

Application Amount

If you correctly select and apply a slow-release fertilizer formulated for your tree, you should only need to apply 2 to 4 pounds of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet of application. The total application for a growing season should not exceed 6 pounds of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet.

Now, we know that nutrition for trees is not an exact science, but an expert opinion can be invaluable. We hope you’ll trust us at Austin Tree Service to provide that expert opinion. We want to keep your trees healthy and well fed. Give us a call today at 512-341-8888.

 

Why is Proper Water Drainage Necessary to Protect Trees

You need proper water drainage. It’s necessary to protect your trees. Without good water drainage, a tree can slowly drown. It can take just a few days or maybe a few years, but it will happen. The tree without good water drainage will die from a lack of oxygen and nutrients. Waterlogged soils prevent aeration of plant roots and create susceptibility to diseases such as root rot. If you can correct your water drainage problems during lawn installation or tree planting, then you may just save your tree.

Percolation Test

Before you plant a tree, you should evaluate the proposed planting area by performing a percolation test. What’s that you may ask? Well, percolation refers to how quickly water drains through the soil. To test your lawn’s percolation, dig a few holes within the potential root area of the mature tree – generally inside of and just beyond the canopy of the tree. Measure the rate of water drainage. You should make the holes between 18 to 36 inches deep and 6 to 12 inches wide. About three holes will provide thorough evaluation of the site. Fill the holes with water and allow the water to completely drain out of the holes before refilling with water to the tops of the holes. Measure the water drainage every hour. Percolation at the rate of 1 to 2 inches per hour indicates good water drainage.

Soil Compaction

Lawns around new construction are often shallow and compacted from foot traffic and heavy equipment. You should amend your soil to improve tilth and water drainage by incorporating 1 to 2 inches of organic matter such as peat moss or compost into the top 4 to 6 inches of soil. Cultivate your soil prior to and after the addition of these amendments to facilitate mixing them with the existing soil. Organic matter provides both moisture retention and better water drainage through the creation of larger soil pores.

Drainage Chimney

When poor water drainage is due to a hardpan or impervious layer under your topsoil, drainage chimneys can correct the problem. With a posthole digger, dig 8 to 12 inches wide holes that are deep enough to break through the compacted layer into the porous soil. Fill the holes with gravel. The spacing of the drainage chimney is site-specific and depends on the degree of waterlogging you find. Begin with evenly spaced chimneys just outside the dripline of the tree. Add more drainage chimneys until you’ve corrected the problem.

French Drain

You can install a French drain to move water away from a low-lying area. You don’t want your trees to get waterlogged as this can lead to diseases such as root rot. Begin building the French drain within the dripline of your tree and dig deep enough to get below the root area. You will then excavate a trench leading away from the tree to a lower level, using a slope of 3 inches per 25 linear feet. The width of the trench should be at least 6 inches. You can put 4-inch-diameter permeable pipe in the bottom of the trench to help with water drainage. Then, fill the trench with gravel and rock.

Of course, we hope you don’t need to take extreme measures to ensure that your tree has proper water drainage. We encourage you to think before you plant and to know your soil and your situation. A tree has the best chance of surviving when its environment provides for proper water drainage naturally. If you need help in deciding where to plant your tree, we are happy to provide it. Give us a call at 512-341-8888 today for more information. We’re Austin Tree Service and we want all your trees to be healthy.

How to Care for your New Tree

Fall and winter are the best time to plant trees since they don’t suffer from transplant shock as much as summer planted trees. Trees need the opportunity to grow roots before being subjected to summer heat and dryness. In this blog post, we will attempt to outline the primary maintenance considerations for planting and growing trees.

Fertilizing

During the first growing season, don’t fertilize with high nitrogen fertilizer. Use root stimulators (monthly during growing season) or slow release organic fertilizer at half the recommended rate. During the second growing season, fertilize 3-4 times a year using a slow release fertilizer.

Never use an herbicide containing fertilizer anywhere near the tree’s root system!

Pruning

A properly dug and planted tree needs no pruning except to remove broken branches and growth faults (crossing branches and downward growing).

Lower branches should be left on the tree as long as possible. After the first year, no more than 1 whirl of limbs should be removed each year. The use of pruning paints (except on oak trees) is not recommended.

Watering and Mulching

Water the newly planted tree until the hole is soaked. This will saturate the roots. Water, as needed, for at least 18 months by placing a soaker hose around the base of the tree and slowly (several hours) saturate the area. Do not depend on a sprinkler system to do the job. Usually you need to water when the soil has dried to a depth of 4-6 inches. An easy way to test soil wetness is by probing with an 18-inch piece of iron rebar. If the rebar is wet or muddy, do not water. If the probe comes out dry or damp on the end, it’s time to water. During a hot, dry summer, check the soil every 4-5 days. It is equally important that you do not overwater a native or adapted tree as that could lead to disease.

Place mulch over the area of disturbed earth, leaving a few bare inches around the trunk.  Mulch helps soil retain moisture while also preventing soil compaction. Please keep lawnmowers, etc. away from the root area. During the first year, add mulch 3-4 times during the year.

These are some basic rules for how to care for your new tree. If you have any more questions, please contact our office at 512-341-8888. We are always ready to help you understand how to care for your new tree.

Practicing Water Conservation with Your Trees

You are environmentally conscious. You want to know how to practice water conservation while keeping your trees healthy. In this article, we’ll focus on how to water trees at all stages of their lives and give you tips for practicing water conservation.

Watering newly planted trees

When trees are first planted, most of their roots are located inside the original root ball. Therefore, the tree should be watered in a way that encourages growth outside of the root ball. The goal is to encourage the establishment of roots in the soil. So, with a newly planted tree, you should water the soil under the canopy. This will keep the root ball and the surrounding soil moist enough to boost healthy growth. In moderate climates, you should do this twice a week. You should increase to three times a week when the weather is hot and dry. In the case of a steady rain shower, you can count that as one day of watering. When rain occurs, it’s the best way for you to conserve water while still ensuring that the root ball gets the moisture it needs to grow.

Watering established trees

The growing season for trees is late spring to early summer. It can take two growing seasons for a tree to become fully established. Once this happens, a tree’s water requirements change. The tree needs less frequent watering. The technique to deliver the water is adjusted as well. For established trees, you will want to water in a circular motion around the dripline. The dripline is the wide band around the outer reaches of the canopy. An established tree should be watered several feet around its dripline to ensure that roots, which have grown past the dripline at this point, are getting the water that they need.

When it comes to water conservation while irrigating established trees, here are two valuable tips:

  1. Soak the entire area under the canopy. Allowing the water to soak deep into the soil near the roots is preferable to spraying the surface. Soaking the soil when watering trees will reduce the frequency of watering the trees.
  2. Avoid watering the tree trunk. Too much water on the trunk or the area directly adjacent to the trunk can increase the risks of tree rot and other diseases. Having a drip system installed can keep the water deep in the soil where it belongs – and it can deliver the preferred soaking method described above.

Water conservation when watering trees requires that you water smart, not often. It’s not hard to conserve water when you water trees. Follow our tips and you will be well on your way to doing just that. You can irrigate your trees with a low amount of water. It will keep them healthy and strong. For more information on water conservation, visit our blog. You can also call us at 512-341-8888 for more information.

A Bit About Tree Wounds

Wounds on trees are nothing new. Humankind has noticed them for over 4,000 years. During this time, hundreds of different types of materials have been applied to tree wounds to protect the exposed wood and promote rapid wound closure. Tree wound treatment is more of an art form than a science.

How do trees get wounds?

Mechanical injuries to trees result from many causes. Most occur as acts of nature such as breakage from snow, wind, ice, feeding by animals or even careless acts of people. Yes, people cause many wounds to trees, and they are usually unintentional. They cause these tree wounds with automobiles, construction equipment, lawn mowers which bump the tree unnecessarily or even improper pruning.  Sometimes, intentional tree wounds are caused to help the tree such as when adding chemicals or pruning leaves properly. These wounds still need to heal.

How can you classify tree wounds?

There are three different types of tree wounds. They are branch wounds, trunk wounds and root damage. Branch wounds are usually caused when a tree loses a branch. The wounds from these branch stubs usually heal. When they heal too slowly or not at all, the tree could find itself in serious trouble by developing decay. Poorly healed tree branch wounds are a major entry point for microorganisms that can cause decay.

There are many different types of tree trunk wounds. Most of them heal on their own. The good news about trees is that they can usually seal off or compartmentalize a tree wound on its own. Of course, when a tree is wounded, the injury can become a pathway for disease, insects and even decay. This situation may be repeated many times during the life of the tree which is why proper tree care can really help save your trees.

Surface roots are vital to a tree’s health and longevity. They absorb moisture necessary for growth. The roots also provide support but are often damaged during the construction of buildings, patios, roadways and paving. Care should be taken under a tree canopy to prevent root injury. The addition of extra soil during construction – especially if it’s piled on top of the tree’s surface roots – is a major cause of tree injury. Injured roots weaken the foundation of the tree and, with time and the advancing decay process, could cause a tree to be blown over in a storm or face some other potential hazard.

Austin Tree Service, Inc. can help you when you have tree wounds. We can identify the wounds and enact the proper course of action to keep your tree protected. We love to work with trees and improve their health. For more information on getting help for a wounded tree, please contact us at 512-341-8888. We look forward to working with you.

Protect Your Trees from Drought and Summer Heat

SummerTreesHeat is a common weather pattern in Texas during the summer. Sometimes, the heat gets extreme. Without much rain, many trees will struggle through a drought period. So, how do you protect your trees from drought and summer heat? They kind of go hand in hand. When there’s too much heat, subsoil moisture is completely gone. Trees lose water faster than they can replace it.

Trees will begin to show signs of drought stress. These can include:

  • Wilted foliage,
  • Leaf scorch,
  • Sparse canopy,
  • Undersized leaves,
  • Yellowing,
  • Leaf drop,
  • And premature fall coloring.

If you look at the tree closely, you may also see stunted twig and bud growth. Trees that are susceptible to summer heat or drought conditions can also have problems with insects and diseases.

To protect your trees from drought and summer heat, you can take certain actions such as:

  • Mulching,
  • Watering,
  • Fertilizing,
  • And pruning.

Mulching

Mulching is a significant way to protect trees and shrubs in the summer. It provides the soil with many benefits such as nutrition, increased moisture, weed suppression and temperature moderation. Of course, remember to water trees before mulching. Mulch should be layered 2-inches deep with no contact between the mulch and the tree trunk. If you put the mulch too close to the bark, the moisture will build up and can cause decay. Some experts recommend that you spread the mulch to a width of about one foot around the tree for best results.

Watering

Trees require more water in the summer than at other times of the year. Watering trees and shrubs during the hottest part of the day is not a good idea, however. This can lead to evaporation before the water reaches the root. Water your trees slowly to prevent over-watering. By watering properly, your trees will have a deep root system. If you water in small amounts daily, you can also avoid root rot. The best time to water is between 10pm and 6am.

Fertilizing

You should fertilize your trees throughout the year. The early summer months, however, are the best times for nitrogen-based fertilizer. This works especially well if your leaves are becoming discolored or wilted. Determining the right balance of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium can be difficult. Folks who work at gardening stores might be able to help you out.

Pruning

When you are pruning your trees, you should focus on removing dead, damaged and diseased branches. This will protect your trees from heavy storms by reducing wind resistance. Of course, you should probably have a certified arborist like the one at Austin Tree Service do the pruning. We will make sure to get the branches that are necessary.

We hope that this blog post has helped you protect your trees from drought and summer heat. Unfortunately, those weather conditions are unavoidable in Central Texas. If you ever have any questions or want more information, feel free to call us at 512-341-8888. We’re happy to help.

Watering Your Trees During the Summer

wateringtreesIt’s summer in Texas. That means heat, heat and more heat. How do you keep your trees healthy during this time of intense heat? Luckily, we’re not under drought conditions like in previous summers. With the healthy amount of rain we had this spring, our watering restrictions are better than they have been. Regardless, it’s still important to monitor your watering schedule and methods for watering your trees.

Trees should be watered regularly and correctly to ensure their lasting health.  Newly planted trees need water the most. Without enough water, they can experience slowed root and shoot growth. This can cause the tree to become stunted in its height. Once stunting occurs, it’s difficult for a tree to make up for the lost growth. Newly planted trees should be watered once a week. Weekly watering should continue not only through the summer but also into the fall. You want to do this until the tree is well established in the landscape.

So, what are some water guidelines you should follow?

Keep your soil moist but not soaked. Too much water, especially in a heavy clay soil, can damage a tree. How? It eliminates air from the soil and suffocates the roots. You don’t want your soil to remain saturated constantly. It needs to dry out between watering sessions. The mulch around the tree can help you determine when to water. If the soil below the surface of the mulch is dry, it’s time to water.  If the mulch is still moist, then you should probably wait to water.

The standard rule for summer in Central Texas is to water at least once a week at the rate of ten gallons for every diameter inch of the tree. For example, if you have a three-inch diameter tree, you need thirty gallons of water for it.

When applying water, make sure you do it slowly. You don’t want to soak the tree. Slower watering makes sure that the deep roots get fed.  Light surface watering like you do with sprinklers on your lawn is not sufficient for trees. This type of watering can promote shallow root growth while starving the deeper roots. The best place to apply water is the outer half of the root ball area under the canopy.

A soaker hose is probably the best way to water your trees. It can water a greater area at one time and does not need to be moved as often. A soaker hose also allows for gentle watering which is what you need for your trees. If you blast water under the drip line, you may remove essential nutrients to the tree and wash away useful soil.

Why is it important not to overwater your trees?

Overwatering leads to a lot of declining trees each year. Tree roots can’t breathe and, if they don’t have a drying out period, the roots will slowly begin to die. One symptom of too much watering is the unexpected lightening or yellowing of leaves.  It starts on the lower part of the tree and slowly moves outward. Other symptoms include wilting of young shoots or brittle green leaves.

It’s summer in Texas. That means heat, heat and more heat. How do you keep your trees healthy during this time of intense heat? Luckily, we’re not under drought conditions like in previous summers. With the healthy amount of rain we had this spring, our watering restrictions are better than they have been. Regardless, it’s still important to monitor your watering schedule and methods for watering your trees.

Trees should be watered regularly and correctly to ensure their lasting health.  Newly planted trees need water the most. Without enough water, they can experience slowed root and shoot growth. This can cause the tree to become stunted in its height. Once stunting occurs, it’s difficult for a tree to make up for the lost growth. Newly planted trees should be watered once a week. Weekly watering should continue not only through the summer but also into the fall. You want to do this until the tree is well established in the landscape.

So, what are some water guidelines you should follow?

Keep your soil moist but not soaked. Too much water, especially in a heavy clay soil, can damage a tree. How? It eliminates air from the soil and suffocates the roots. You don’t want your soil to remain saturated constantly. It needs to dry out between watering sessions. The mulch around the tree can help you determine when to water. If the soil below the surface of the mulch is dry, it’s time to water.  If the mulch is still moist, then you should probably wait to water.

The standard rule for summer in Central Texas is to water at least once a week at the rate of ten gallons for every diameter inch of the tree. For example, if you have a three-inch diameter tree, you need thirty gallons of water for it.

When applying water, make sure you do it slowly. You don’t want to soak the tree. Slower watering makes sure that the deep roots get fed.  Light surface watering like you do with sprinklers on your lawn is not sufficient for trees. This type of watering can promote shallow root growth while starving the deeper roots. The best place to apply water is the outer half of the root ball area under the canopy.

A soaker hose is probably the best way to water your trees. It can water a greater area at one time and does not need to be moved as often. A soaker hose also allows for gentle watering which is what you need for your trees. If you blast water under the drip line, you may remove essential nutrients to the tree and wash away useful soil.

Why is it important not to overwater your trees?

Overwatering leads to a lot of declining trees each year. Tree roots can’t breathe and, if they don’t have a drying out period, the roots will slowly begin to die. One symptom of too much watering is the unexpected lightening or yellowing of leaves.  It starts on the lower part of the tree and slowly moves outward. Other symptoms include wilting of young shoots or brittle green leaves.

Which trees need water the most?

It’s the new trees that need the most water. Newly planted trees should be watered regularly especially between the months of April through September for the first 2-3 years after they’ve been planted. This will give them the time they need to become successfully established in your landscape. It gives them the best chance of survival.

Established trees don’t generally need to be watered. The rain that comes naturally is usually enough. Of course, you should observe your trees to see if they are suffering from drought stress. In that case, they could probably use a watering. If you do water an older tree, concentrate on the area under the crown or foliage.

When is the best time of day to water your trees?

When it’s as hot as Texas gets, you should water your trees after dark and before sunrise if possible. Between 10 pm and 8 am is a good guideline. Trees relieve water deficits during the night. There is also less evaporation of the water during these hours because the sun is not bearing down on your yard. If you plant drought tolerant trees, they have the best chance of survival.

If you have any questions about watering your trees, please don’t hesitate to contact us at Austin Tree Service. We are happy to help you determine if and when your trees need to be watered. Call us at 512-341-8888.

 

Bamboo Removals – They’re Not As Easy As You’d Think

bamboo_removalYou have bamboo trees and you love them. Unfortunately, it’s time to think of bamboo removals because your trees are not thriving and you’ve tried everything to get them healthy again. Bamboo is an aggressive and invasive tree. They create a strong and complex network that makes the emergence of new culms unpredictable. Bamboo removals can be a daunting task. In this article, we’ll go over some things that can be done to make bamboo removals stick so that no new shoots crop up.

You should probably follow the advice of the American Bamboo Society’s advice. If you want to get rid of bamboo, you should probably do the following:

  1. Cut it off. All of the culms (stalks) of bamboo in a clump are interconnected under the ground by rhizomes, aka underground stems. To deal with them appropriately, you should cut them by digging a ditch or cutting a line with a spade. Many people make the mistake of thinking that each separate culm is a tree, but it’s not. They’re usually part of the larger tree. Isolate the portion you want to keep if there is a portion and cut rhizomes with a saw or a drill. You will have to do this every year because bamboo shoots have the nasty habit of re-growing.
  2. Cut it down. You’ll want to cut the grove to the ground. All of it. If there’s any part you want to keep, see step 1.
  3. Water and fertilize the area to generate new growth. This may seem antithetical, but you want to catch the new growth early so you can eradicate it more easily.
  4. Cut it down again. And again. New shoots will come up from the rhizomes. Break them off or cut them with pruning shears. Keep doing this until no new shoots come up. This may take weeks or months. It’s not a simple process. When you do this, you will exhaust the energy of the rhizomes underground. Without green leaves to photosynthesize and produce new energy, the rhizomes will no longer be able to send up new shoots. They will be left behind and will eventually rot away.

Of course, since this process is so complex, you may want the help of a professional like Austin Tree Service. We can take care of bamboo removals so you don’t have to. Give us a call at 512-341-8888.

 

Earth-Wise Guide to Tree Care – Tree Renewal

renewalThe Earth-Wise Guide to Tree Care’s final installment will be all about tree renewal. Tree renewal deals with planting new trees. It’s an optimistic and sustainable investment demonstrating our commitment to the future.

If you do plant new trees, you should make a commitment to them. Determine the available time and money to care for your tree once it’s planted. A tree is an investment. They yield higher quality benefits when you plant and care for them properly.

When watering new trees, you should do it thoroughly once a week. Watering trees when they’re in the ground for less than two years should be done near the planting area to the dripline. This is because those trees have less developed root systems. The watering will help with root development.

Remember that small trees need less water during their establishment. Trees are a wonderful thing, especially newly planted ones. Why? It’s because they adapt quickly to new conditions. You should help this along by planting new trees in the right location. You’ll want to consider the following before planting your new tree:

  • Soil type,
  • Access to water,
  • Shade,
  • Landscape function,
  • And sufficient space for mature tree height and width.

Trees that are placed in the proper location will be healthier and require less water.

When planting, you should utilize a diverse palette of native trees. You’ll want to plant them at the proper depth – that means no deeper than the depth of soil in the rootball. Planting season is October to March so plant your tree during that time frame. When you do mulch, make sure it’s 3-4 inches deep and that the mulch is 4-5 inches away from the base of the trunk.

That’s it for the Earth-Wise Guide to Tree Care. You now know how to evaluate, nurture and renew your trees. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at Austin Tree Care at 512-341-8888 for more information. We’re happy to help.